• CARMA SEMINAR
  • Speaker: Dr Mike Meylan, CARMA, The University of Newcastle
  • Title: Lax-Phillips Scattering Theory for Simple Wave Scattering
  • Location: Room V205, Mathematics Building (Callaghan Campus) The University of Newcastle
  • Time and Date: 2:00 pm, Thu, 30th Aug 2018
  • Abstract:

    Lax-Philips scattering theory is a method to solve for scattering as an expansion over the singularities of the analytic extension of the scattering problem to complex frequencies. I will show how a complete theory can be developed in the case of simple scattering problems. I will illustrate how this theory can be used to find a numerical solution and I will illustrate the method by applying it to the vibration of ice shelves.

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  • CARMA COLLOQUIUM
  • Speaker: Dr Mike Meylan, CARMA, The University of Newcastle
  • Title: Wave Scattering in the Marginal Ice Zone
  • Location: Room V205, Mathematics Building (Callaghan Campus) The University of Newcastle
  • Time and Date: 4:00 pm, Thu, 9th Oct 2014
  • Abstract:

    One of the key components in the earth’s climate is the formation and melting of sea ice. Currently, we struggle to model correctly this process. One possible explanation for this shortcoming is that ocean waves play a key role and that their effect needs to be include in climate models. I will describe a series of recent experiments which seem to validate this hypothesis and discuss attempts my myself and others to model wave-ice interaction.

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  • CARMA OANT SEMINAR
  • Speaker: Dr Mike Meylan, CARMA, The University of Newcastle
  • Title: Linear Water Waves in the Time-Domain
  • Location: Room V205, Mathematics Building (Callaghan Campus) The University of Newcastle
  • Access Grid Venue: UNewcastle [ENQUIRIES]
  • Time and Date: 3:00 pm, Mon, 17th Sep 2012
  • Abstract:

    Linear Water Wave theory is one of the most important branches on fluid mechanics. Practically it underpins most of the engineering design of ships, offshore structures, etc. It also has a very rich history in the development of applied mathematics. In this talk I will focus on the connection between solutions in the frequency and time-domains and show how we can use various formulations to make numerical calculations and to construct approximate solutions. I will illustrate these methods with application to some simple wave scattering problems.

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